Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus RSS

Newark Tech Summit: Human workforce is key

By ,
From left, Aisha Glover, president of Newark Economic Development Corp.; Alize Garcia, community affairs manager at Intersection; Mbacke Faye, urban planning associate at the Newark Downtow District; and Mark Smukler, CEO of Bixby take part in a discussion at Newark Tech Week.
From left, Aisha Glover, president of Newark Economic Development Corp.; Alize Garcia, community affairs manager at Intersection; Mbacke Faye, urban planning associate at the Newark Downtow District; and Mark Smukler, CEO of Bixby take part in a discussion at Newark Tech Week. - ()

Technological advancement is happening in Newark because of talented employees who are contributing to innovation.

Technological advancement is happening in Newark because of talented employees who are contributing to innovation.  

This theme took center stage at the third annual Newark Tech Summit on Tuesday night, the kick off to the start of Newark Tech Week, featuring dozens of technological companies.  

Aisha Glover, president of the Newark Economic Development Corp., came to Newark three years ago to work for Mayor Ras Baraka. The Newark CEDC supports $4 billion of development and puts equity front and center.

“No company wants to move anywhere if they cannot get access to great talent,” Glover said. “We are in a college town. Besides all the talent, we are an 18-minute ride from [Manhattan].”

Ben Korman, the owner of the Two Gateway building and the founder of Lotus Equity Group, said Newark is a community ideal for living, working and playing. He said Newark benefits from parks, museums, the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, and fiber-optics that enable quick Internet speeds.

“This city is on the rise and this city is happening,” Korman said. “Newark has a friendly business environment. There is one thing you should remember: Newark is primed to become the next great tech city.”

Ari Rabban, CEO of tech startup Phone.com, located his company in Newark. Even though his company is 10 years old he keeps the mindset of a startup. He cited the New Jersey Institute of Technology hosting of the Voice Summit this past summer to show that technological innovation is occurring in Newark.

Rabban came to New Jersey 23 years ago to work for Bell Labs. Shortly thereafter, he joined a voice-over IP company.

“There is no city that is successful in the world that does not have a tech aspect,” Rabban said. “… Tech in Newark is not new. … It is doing great things and a lot more. The development that is happening in Newark attracted us in the first place.”

Mark Smukler, CEO of Newark-based real estate company Bixby, has developed an app to help property owners. This app helps people to get discounts from local businesses.

“Technology for the sake of technology does not improve quality of life,” Smukler said.

You May Have Missed...

David Hutter

David Hutter


David Hutter grew up in Darien, Conn., and covers higher education, transportation and manufacturing for NJBIZ. He can be reached at dhutter@njbiz.com.

Leave a Comment

test

Please note: All comments will be reviewed and may take up to 24 hours to appear on the site.

Post Comment
View Comment Policy

Comments

close