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Murphy announces narrowing of PARCC exams

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Gov. Phil Murphy visits a school to sign legislation designating the Bog Turtle as the office reptile of new Jersey, in June.
Gov. Phil Murphy visits a school to sign legislation designating the Bog Turtle as the office reptile of new Jersey, in June. - ()

New Jersey will begin scaling down how much it relies on the controversial PARCC standardized testing, Gov. Phil Murphy announced Tuesday.

PARCC, short for the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, was unpopular and contentious when former Gov. Chris Christie rolled out the exams out in 2015. Speaking at a press conference at the Golden Nugget Casino in Atlantic City, Murphy said the plan eliminates four PARCC exams, reduces test time by 25 percent and lowers how much grades are considered in teacher evaluations.

The tests to be eliminated include Algebra II and Geometry, and the ninth and 11th grade exams in reading. The changes go into effect starting in the 2018-2018 school year.

“By making the transition in phases, we can ensure a smooth implementation in schools across the state and maintain compliance with current state and federal requirements” Murphy said.

The New Jersey Education Association, which is the state's largest teachers union, opposes PARCC.

“The goal is to get to a place where we think it’s acceptable,” Murphy said. “[But] I still don’t like it, and I’m not going to wake up some day and become a fan of PARCC.”

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Daniel J. Munoz

Daniel J. Munoz


Daniel Munoz covers politics and state government for NJBIZ. You can contact him at dmunoz@njbiz.com.

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Richard Russo July 12, 2018 3:11 pm

I guess there is no limit to the Governor's selling out the public interest in order to obtain political support of the NJEA. His political team must feel that he can safely flush public school students' futures down the political toilet since they don't vote and their families might not understand or care about the issues. So sad for these students and for the State.

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