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JCP&L to spend $357M to upgrade equipment

By ,
Jim Fakult, president, JCP&L
Jim Fakult, president, JCP&L - ()

Jersey Central Power & Light will spend $357 million this year to upgrade and replace equipment to improve customer reliability.

The projects include replacing remote-controlled substation equipment used to monitor and respond to grid conditions, replacing 34.5 kilovolt substation circuit breakers, replacing 40 automated control units at various substations, enhancing security systems at seven substations, replacing 24 substation circuit breakers, upgrading more than 90 circuits, replacing distribution oil-filled circuit breakers, and installing new equipment at 54 sites on the distribution system.

These projects come after JCP&L spent $308 million in 2017 to build new transmission lines, install voltage-regulating equipment and automated controls.  

JCP&L serves 1.1 million New Jersey customers in the counties of Burlington, Essex, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union and Warren. JCP&L is a subsidiary of Morristown-based FirstEnergy Corp.

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David Hutter

David Hutter grew up in Darien, Connecticut, and covers higher education, transportation, and economic development for NJBIZ. He can be reached at dhutter@njbiz.com

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Bob March 5, 2018 9:36 am

Oh, so I guess JCP&L (Just Can't Provide 'Lectric) is going to upgrade their coffee pots and executive washrooms, cause I know they sure as h*** aren't going to upgrade anything in their infrastructure. NJ should investigate and prosecute these scumbags under the RICO act for their incompetence and theft of public funds given their disgusting performance post-Sandy, and especially in light of this recent storm after they have had YEARS to upgrade and replace facilities that were clear in need of such, and to remove branches and trees that were clearly a threat to their so-called resiliency.