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MILLENNIALS' MOMENT: It's their time

An NJBIZ Special Report: Understanding the next generation is the key to your future success

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    For all that you have heard about millennials but were not really sure if it was true — they want to work when they want to work … their idea of work-life balance is heavily tilted toward life … they have no sense of loyalty or paying their dues — understand that this one simple fact appears to be 100 percent accurate:

    By next year, millennials will represent the majority of the global workforce. And by 2020, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts they will become the majority of the workforce in the United States, too.

    That's right — the millennial generation isn't just coming. It's already here.

    Ignore them — or worse, try to change them — at your own peril. For they are not the enemy; they are the key to your success.

    They are just different.

    They certainly don't think like baby boomers — or even Generation X (if you know someone who can define this group, let us know). But as the baby boomers did, their ideas and attitudes will drive the nature of business for the next few decades.

    In this special report, NJBIZ examines their impact on the workforce while analyzing the various stereotypes that have come to define them. We even took our own unscientific survey to get an inside look at their mindset.

     

    Part 1: The definition of a millennial

    1. MILLENNIALS' MOMENT: THE FUTURE IS NOW (Millennials aren't just in the workplace — they are getting ready to take over. Are you ready? Many of your competitors are)

    2. MILLENNIALS' MOMENT: What makes a millennial?

    3. MILLENNIALS' MOMENT: What millennials want

    4. TAKE THE NJBIZ POLL: Does your workplace follow the supposed stereotypical millennial vision of a balanced work-life structure with ample opportunity for personal and professional growth?

     

    Part 2: Here's closer look at five ways millennials are taking New Jersey by storm

    1. Manufacturing a new workplace: BASF taking steps to ensure company appeals to wants of next generation of employees

    2. When the money man looks like a kid: Formisano has found ways to use his youth to win over older clients

    3. The modern commute doesn't have to include a car

    4. Job jumping is way of life: New workers, eager to make impact, quick to seek new opportunities

    5. Bringing a 'real-time perspective' to Trenton: Rodriguez-Gregg, at 32, gives younger generation voice in General Assembly

     

    Coming Wednesday: The debut of NJBIZ's Millennial Minded blog written by our own millennials.

    This special report was brought to you by … our millennials
    NJBIZ has welcomed millennials into our newsroom in a big way, as six of our editorial staffers fall into the group.

    We thought you’d like to get to know a little about them — and what they want out of work. (Listed from left to right)

    Josh Burd (29)
    Managing editor

    New York University (2007)
    Top work want: To have stability and structure — and a lot of people who make it fun to be there.

    Meg Fry (26)
    Staff writer
    DePaul (2010)
    Top work want: To have the opportunity and flexibility to grow, travel, innovate and discover one’s unique purpose in the workplace.

    Andrew George (25)
    Statehouse correspondent
    George Washington University (2011)
    Top work want: To be immersed in my field, allowing me to develop my skill set and grow as a professional.

    Emily Bader (25)
    Web/copy editor
    Rutgers (2011)
    Top work want: To constantly learn, be given opportunities to grow and take risks. It wouldn’t be enjoyable otherwise.

    Brett Johnson (25)
    Staff writer
    Cal State Sacramento (2012)
    Top work want: To have enough of a busy, deadline-driven environment to allow hours to fly by.

    Andrew Sheldon (26)
    Staff writer
    Rutgers (2010)
    Top work want: To be mentally engaged, with balanced autonomy and guidance.

     

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