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Nursing initiative helps four more earn their doctorates

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    - (NJBIZ file photo)

    Four more nurse scholars have completed their doctorates with funding from the New Jersey Nursing Initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which aims to increase the ranks of nursing school faculty to train the next generation of nurses.

    Since it launched in 2009, the NJNI has supported 51 New Jersey nursing scholars whose master’s or doctoral degrees qualify them for nurse faculty positions. NJNI’s final group of scholars, 10 nursing doctoral candidates, continues in its programs. 

    “We’re proud to help fuel the pipeline of nurse faculty needed to educate the next generation of nurses,” said NJNI Program co-Director Susan W. Salmond.  

    The initiative was launched to address the projected shortage of nurses in New Jersey, where a large number of nurses are nearing retirement age.

    “NJNI’s focus on the state’s nurse faculty shortage has helped us better understand where to go next,” said NJNI Program co-Director Aline Holmes. “Now we’re encouraging the state’s nursing programs to teach the relevant skills that will help students succeed in meeting emerging health care needs.”

    Three of NJNI’s New Jersey Nursing Scholars completed doctorates at the Rutgers School of Nursing: Shanda Johnson ofScotch Plains, Aleesa M. Mobley of Williamstown and Catherine Jirak Monetti of Mountain Lakes. Jenee Skinner-Hamlercompleted her master’s degree at Rutgers and received funding from NJNI to complete her doctor of nursing practice degree at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

    Mobley, a nursing doctoral graduate who holds an adjunct faculty position at Rowan University and is pursuing a full-time tenure-track position there, said that NJNI “encouraged and enhanced better teaching skills. I plan on giving my professional best in return.”

    Johnson, a family nurse practitioner who plans to teach part time this fall, said: “I’d like to eventually serve as a dean or in a similar leadership role. It’s important to have nurses in those positions.”

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    Beth Fitzgerald

    Beth Fitzgerald

    Beth Fitzgerald reports on health care, small business and higher education. She joined NJBIZ in 2008 after a 34-year career at the Star-Ledger and has been reporting on business in New Jersey since 1978. Her email is beth@njbiz.com and she is @bethfitzgerald8 on Twitter.

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