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With veto, Christie rejects new contracts for DRBA employees

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Gov. Chris Christie announced that he had vetoed minutes from a recent Delaware River and Bay Authority meeting.
Gov. Chris Christie announced that he had vetoed minutes from a recent Delaware River and Bay Authority meeting. - (Governor's Office / Tim Larsen)

Gov. Chris Christie announced Tuesday that he had vetoed minutes from a recent Delaware River and Bay Authority meeting, effectively rejecting recently approved contracts for union and non-union employees at the bi-state agency.

Christie vetoed minutes from the DRBA’s April 7 meeting, during which three-year contracts were approved that would have allowed for annual 1.9 percent salary increases and employee-sharing of health care premiums at an unchanged rate of 10 percent.

Such contracts would be out of touch with the rest of public employees in New Jersey, Christie said.

“The DRBA is well aware that New Jersey state employees and many local employees have already moved to a higher level of healthcare cost sharing than what is paid by DRBA employees today and that there must be equity in these times of fiscal restraint to protect taxpayers and tollpayers alike,” Christie said. “The DRBA’s attempted action here is clearly contrary to that principle and inconsistent with the contracts public employees are living under in New Jersey today.”

The DRBA features six commissioners each from New Jersey and Delaware and operates the Delaware Memorial Bridge, Cape May-Lewes Ferry, Delaware City-Salem Ferry and other entities including five regional airports.

The agency will next meet on May 20.

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Andrew George

Andrew George

Andrew George covers the Statehouse from NJBIZ's Trenton bureau. Born and raised in N.J., Andrew has also spent time as a reporter in D.C., Texas and Pa. His email is andrewg@njbiz.com and he is @AndrGeorge on Twitter.

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