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NJBIA president: ACA confusion, wage hike will make early 2014 tough for employers

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NJBIA president Phil Kirschner
NJBIA president Phil Kirschner - (Andrew George / NJBIZ)

It’s what New Jersey’s business groups have long been calling the “perfect storm.”

A combination of the continued confusion surrounding the Affordable Care Act rollout, a rise in the state’s minimum wage and looming mandatory paid sick-leave legislation could potentially all hit employers at once in the next few months.

But as New Jersey Business & Industry Association president Phil Kirschner points out, the traditionally slow business months of January and February won’t be at all beneficial to employers as they attempt to juggle all of the moving parts.

“It just so happens that those are the worst two months of the year,” Kirschner said. “I think this impact will be felt.”

Given the several mitigating factors in place, employers may have to make some tough decisions in the early months of 2014, he said.

“I think there are going to be a lot of disappointed people come their next paycheck,” Kirschner said.

Kirschner said that while employers whose businesses will be affected by the minimum wage increase are most likely already prepared to endure its changes, the lack of clarity surrounding Obamacare remains a big challenge.

“Business people can’t deal with that,” Kirschner said of the uncertainty.


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Andrew George

Andrew George

Andrew George covers the Statehouse from NJBIZ's Trenton bureau. Born and raised in N.J., Andrew has also spent time as a reporter in D.C., Texas and Pa. His email is andrewg@njbiz.com and he is @AndrGeorge on Twitter.

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