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Breaking Glass

Breaking barriers: Finding success in male-dominated fields

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Anne Marie Almasi, president of Almasi Companies.
Anne Marie Almasi, president of Almasi Companies. - (Aaron Houston)

Some of the first stories I wrote when I started at NJBIZ were about women excelling in fields traditionally dominated by men. For some women, that whole "success-in-a-male-dominated-field" thing is a source of pride. For others, it's just a day at the office.

Regardless, here's a look back at what some of the women in New Jersey are doing in the fields of engineering, science, construction and math.

Anne Marie Almasi, president of Almasi Companies, joined her husband's construction business when she was 20 years old and nine months pregnant. She has since launched her own offshoot company and is heavily involved in the New Jersey chapter of Professional Women in Construction. Read more about Anne Marie here.

(A few months later, she shared her thoughts on why the Internet still thinks women in construction looks like this.)

The New Jersey Institute of Technology is among the institutions pushing for higher female student enrollment. But the faculty members there are also working to make the university a more welcoming place for female professors. Check out the groundbreaking social networking site they have created to connect professors across the university here.

Also in tech, a pair of young, female entrepreneurs has launched NJ Tech Gals, a meetup specifically geared toward females in the startup space. One of the founders, Christine Curatolo, spoke with me about their efforts. (She also had some interesting thoughts to share when The Children's Place came out with a T-shirt proclaiming girls were better suited for things like dancing, rather than math.)

And then there was the young woman I met on a Turkish shipping vessel a few months ago, who was building a career as a second officer aboard a massive cargo ship that was docked for just a few hours in the port of New Jersey. She spoke little English, but I was impressed with how she handled herself as the lone woman on a ship full of men.

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Write to the Editorial Department at editorial@njbiz.com

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