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They're keeping an eye out for terrorism concerns As bombings brought Boston to standstill, DVTEL was at work

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DVTEL aims to provide its client companies with technology that helps protect people and infrastructure, says its CEO, Yoav Stern, left. He's pictured in the company's Ridgefield Park offices with Zvi Peled.
DVTEL aims to provide its client companies with technology that helps protect people and infrastructure, says its CEO, Yoav Stern, left. He's pictured in the company's Ridgefield Park offices with Zvi Peled. - ()

As the Boston Marathon bombing unfolded in April, DVTEL's eyes zoomed in on the Massachusetts city.

Boston law enforcement officers used the company's software to meticulously scan events around the city and Logan International Airport in order to find relevant information shortly after the April 16 bombing, DVTEL CEO Yoav Stern said.

The city of Boston is among a growing list of global clients for DVTEL, a Ridgefield Park-based provider of video surveillance technologies. The company says it aims to provide clients with tools to better protect people, premises and infrastructure.

"Anything to do from the camera lens to the human eye, everything in between, we supply it," Stern said.

The company was founded in 2000 and employs about 140 worldwide, including 60 at the Ridgefield Park headquarters. DVTEL's clients include Visa; Google; American Express; the cities of Baltimore and Boston; Logan International Airport, in Boston; the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department; casinos; school campuses; and utility companies.

The company estimates $40 million revenue, including a 25 percent increase last year compared with 2011, attributing growth to increased demand from municipal, corrections, education and health care clients.

The incentive for clients to improve surveillance systems is reduced cost, with organizations able to effectively monitor situations with fewer people, said Stern and the company's chief operating officer, Zvi Peled.

DVTEL seeks to distinguish itself by offering products that can manage large systems, enabling thousands of cameras to work in unison, and creating a one-stop shop with its cameras, software and video analytics.

Some of the tools DVTEL uses to provide its security technology to companies.
Some of the tools DVTEL uses to provide its security technology to companies. - ()

DVTEL installs its software in cameras, which also are owned by the company, though manufacturing is outsourced. Stern said the end products help command-and-control workers not just see images, but understand what to expect.

Stern and Peled cite a hypothetical example of a facility that needs to monitor a particular fence against trespass.

If a suspicious character approaches the fence, DVTEL technology can zoom in and tag a green square atop the individual and alert command-and-control centers so personnel can monitor the situation. But the technology needs to be sophisticated enough not to create false alarms. A cat crossing that fence will not set off red flags, Peled said.

"It's not only handling information, but understanding information," Stern said.

"It's the ability to analyze if what you see is dangerous, or not dangerous; if something should be alerted as an event, or not an event," he added.

Seeing the spread of mobile technology as a growth opportunity, the company last year introduced the smartphone app TruWitness. Stern said wireless applications are attractive because of the high cost of installing wires and maintaining hardware systems.

E-mail to: tomz@njbiz.com
On Twitter: @biztzanki

Write to the Editorial Department at editorial@njbiz.com

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