Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

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January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

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By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

Share This Story On:

Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

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By Eric Strauss
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CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

Share This Story On:

Senate moves forward with EITC increase

By

Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

Share This Story On:

Senate moves forward with EITC increase

By

Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

Share This Story On:

Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

Share This Story On:

Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

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CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
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CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

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CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
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January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

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CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

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By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

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Latest News

Hampshire Cos. buys Piscataway shopping center

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

CONTINUE READING

Pa. bank names regional leader for N.J.

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:26 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Honeywell earnings: 'Capping off another year of terrific performance'

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:36 AM

CONTINUE READING

Periodicals distributor signs lease for South Hackensack site

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 10:59 AM

CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based Dataram names interim CEO

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 11:45 AM

CONTINUE READING

French company buys Carlstadt industrial building

By Eric Strauss
January 23, 2015 02:07 PM

CONTINUE READING

Jersey City mobile platform provider acquires Hipcricket for $4.5M

By Emily Bader
January 22, 2015 10:21 AM

CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 

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Senate moves forward with EITC increase

By

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

Though Democrats have shown little interest in Gov. Christie’s phased-in minimum wage increase, at least one part of the governor’s conditional veto proposal is moving forward.

The Senate Thursday approved a Democrat-sponsored bill to restore the state’s earned income tax credit to 25 percent of the federal credit amount. Christie trimmed the EITC to 20 percent in the Fiscal Year 2011 budget, but he proposed restoring it to 25 percent when he conditionally vetoed the Assembly’s minimum wage bill last month.

In a statement, Sen. Jim Whelan (D-Northfield), one of the bill’s sponsors, said increasing the EITC makes good economic sense.

“By restoring the EITC to its full level in New Jersey, we can help working families to reduce their tax liability and provide them with extra income,” said Whelan. “In turn, they will spend that income, putting money back into our economy and strengthening our economic income.”

Of course, Christie’s EITC proposal was just one part of a package. He also wanted the Legislature to agree to phase the minimum wage increase in over three years and drop the idea of linking it to the Consumer Price Index. Business groups largely approved of Christie’s compromise proposal, but it’s been a non-starter with Assembly Speaker Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange) and Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney (D-West Deptford). Sweeney is now moving forward with his plan to put the minimum wage increase, with a CPI link, on November’s ballot. A poll from October suggested the measure is popular with voters.

The EITC restoration passed the Senate with broad bipartisan support Thursday, 27-1. The vote to put minimum wage on the ballot, however, passed 22-15.

 


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