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Bleak Friday

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1st Constitution Bank Names SVP, commercial lending officer

By Emily Bader
March 1, 2017 11:22 AM

1st Constitution Bank announced recently it has appointed Lisa Borghese as senior vice president and commercial lending officer. CONTINUE READING

Marcus & Millichap announce sale of $3.13M apartment complex in North Bergen

By Emily Bader
March 1, 2017 11:15 AM

Marcus & Millichap announced Wednesday the $3.13 million sale of Riverview Lofts, an apartment property in North Bergen, according to Brian C. Hosey, regional manager of the firm's New Jersey office. CONTINUE READING

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Continuum taps 2 new hires for business and market development

By Emily Bader
February 28, 2017 01:24 PM

Continuum Health Alliance, a physician enablement company based in Marlton, announced Tuesday it has hired two new executives to develop its business services and market needs. CONTINUE READING

Roseland details flurry of activity as 2016 ends and 2017 begins

By Mario Marroquin
February 28, 2017 11:07 AM

Roseland Realty Trust closed out 2016 and has started the new year with some major activity, parent Mack-Cali Realty Corp. announced in a news release detailing some of the projects. CONTINUE READING

Metal manufacturer, whose owner died in 2016, is closing; 200 to lose jobs

By Meg Fry
February 28, 2017 01:00 PM

Crowne Architectural Systems in North Bergen will terminate its operations due to cash flow shortage and leave 200 employees without jobs, according to a federal WARN notice. CONTINUE READING

Stone Systems signs lease in Fairfield

By Mario Marroquin
February 28, 2017 12:20 PM

Commercial real estate firm NAI James E. Hanson announced it has brokered a long-term lease at 5 Washington Ave., Fairfield, between Stone Systems of NJ and 5 Washington Avenue HUH LLC. CONTINUE READING

South Jersey yacht dealership sold

By NJBIZ STAFF
February 28, 2017 11:49 AM

CONTINUE READING

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you’re the kind of person who passes up on after-dinner coffee on Thanksgiving so you can run out and park in front of Best Buy to save $70 on an outdated Blu-Ray player that’s been on the shelf for 14 months with no hope of being sold without the gimmick of a midnight doorbuster, today’s blog isn’t for you.

Well, another Thanksgiving is upon us, and with it, of course, is Black Friday, which I prefer to call Loss Leader Friday, both because it’s a chance for retailers to unload crap they couldn’t sell all year and because you have to be a loser to spend a night in the frigid cold waiting to fill the hole in your life with a new Xbox at a slight discount.

Still, it’s an important moment for retailers, who get to clear out their shelves of unwanted stuff at a discount so they can bring in shiny new things that people actually want, only those will be discounted as well, since everyone knows the best sales are the week before Christmas. We can only hope there won’t be a body count this year.

But all is not well in the world of gigantic retailers. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is fending off a strike as workers protest being forced to work on Thanksgiving. Of course, this is just the natural order of things. Black Friday sales aren’t impressive enough, so you stretch it out a few hours by bleeding it into Thanksgiving. It’s the same reason major shopping malls have Santa visiting before the Columbus Day sales start.

I don’t attempt to relay complex topics in this blog so much as I go for cynical and sarcastic laughs, so if you want the backstory, here’s a good place to start. But the situation got me thinking about my other favorite pastime, you know, besides insulting professional bargain-hunters: professional ice hockey, which of course is locked out. The owners and players’ union can’t figure out how to split a $3 billion pie, so two months of games have been wiped out and many players have taken off to Europe to play.

The average NHL salary, according to Forbes, is $2.4 million a year. There were no U.S. games scheduled for Thanksgiving; a game between two Canadian teams was canceled because of the lockout. The average wage of an hourly cashier at Walmart is about $8.50 an hour. One of these parties has every right to call attention to the labor plight it faces. The other plays a game for a living, and is doing the same now.

Just something to think about, whether you spend the weekend shopping or pining for hockey.

I’m even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

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Bleak Friday

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Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you’re the kind of person who passes up on after-dinner coffee on Thanksgiving so you can run out and park in front of Best Buy to save $70 on an outdated Blu-Ray player that’s been on the shelf for 14 months with no hope of being sold without the gimmick of a midnight doorbuster, today’s blog isn’t for you.

Well, another Thanksgiving is upon us, and with it, of course, is Black Friday, which I prefer to call Loss Leader Friday, both because it’s a chance for retailers to unload crap they couldn’t sell all year and because you have to be a loser to spend a night in the frigid cold waiting to fill the hole in your life with a new Xbox at a slight discount.

Still, it’s an important moment for retailers, who get to clear out their shelves of unwanted stuff at a discount so they can bring in shiny new things that people actually want, only those will be discounted as well, since everyone knows the best sales are the week before Christmas. We can only hope there won’t be a body count this year.

But all is not well in the world of gigantic retailers. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is fending off a strike as workers protest being forced to work on Thanksgiving. Of course, this is just the natural order of things. Black Friday sales aren’t impressive enough, so you stretch it out a few hours by bleeding it into Thanksgiving. It’s the same reason major shopping malls have Santa visiting before the Columbus Day sales start.

I don’t attempt to relay complex topics in this blog so much as I go for cynical and sarcastic laughs, so if you want the backstory, here’s a good place to start. But the situation got me thinking about my other favorite pastime, you know, besides insulting professional bargain-hunters: professional ice hockey, which of course is locked out. The owners and players’ union can’t figure out how to split a $3 billion pie, so two months of games have been wiped out and many players have taken off to Europe to play.

The average NHL salary, according to Forbes, is $2.4 million a year. There were no U.S. games scheduled for Thanksgiving; a game between two Canadian teams was canceled because of the lockout. The average wage of an hourly cashier at Walmart is about $8.50 an hour. One of these parties has every right to call attention to the labor plight it faces. The other plays a game for a living, and is doing the same now.

Just something to think about, whether you spend the weekend shopping or pining for hockey.

I’m even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

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