ERROR: Macro njDefaultArticleHeader is missing!

Your vote still doesn't count

By

Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

Cranbury-based Rafael Pharma partners with Atlantic Health for testing on new cancer drug

By Vince Calio
November 17, 2017 02:12 PM

Cranbury-based Rafael Pharmaceuticals Inc. is partnering with Atlantic Health System to initiate Phase I clinical trials of a new drug to treat pancreatic cancer. CONTINUE READING

Lincoln Property Co. announces activity in Parsippany

By Mario Marroquin
November 17, 2017 11:13 AM

At 800-900 Lanidex Plaza, real estate firm Lincoln Property Co. announced a total of 45,000 square feet across two, three-story office buildings totaling 114,000 square feet. Lincoln worked on behalf of 8H9H Lanidex and Milelli Real Estate Partners. CONTINUE READING

advertisement

Maersk names new North American president

By Vince Calio
November 17, 2017 10:56 AM

Maersk Line North America, based in Florham Park, has appointed Omar Shamsie, a 28-year veteran of the company, as its new president. CONTINUE READING

New Jersey Resources names COO

By November 16, 2017 12:45 PM

Wall-based New Jersey Resources announced it has named Stephen Westhoven executive vice president and chief operating officer. CONTINUE READING

Case hires financial and investment analyst

By Mario Marroquin
November 14, 2017 11:52 AM

Real estate investment firm Case Real Estate Capital recently announced it welcomed Aysha Cox who will serve as a financial investment analyst. CONTINUE READING

Kent Place School names new CFO

By Emily Bader
November 14, 2017 02:14 PM

Summit-based Kent Place School, a college-preparatory day school for young women, announced it has appointed Genevieve Madigan as its new chief financial officer. CONTINUE READING

advertisement

New Jersey voters — the live ones, at least — are used to the sensation that their votes don't count in a presidential election, since we are committed to a blue state, like a maniac depressive patient who refuses to take medication. (The dead voters, by contrast, are just happy someone keeps their memory alive by registering them.)

But a pair of discussed ballot issues could make the next two Novembers elections to remember. I'm referring to, of course, the higher education referendum on the books for this year and the minimum wage question that seems likely to get on the 2013 ballot.

The higher education bond — which would borrow $750 million to fund badly needed improvements at state universities — seems likely to pass, since it involves borrowing, as opposed to sensible budget appropriations, paid for via cuts to other services or new revenue generation, such as putting the Revel casino on a truck and driving it to the Meadowlands. We voters love our borrowing: New Jersey's state bird is the goldfinch, the state insect is the honeybee, the state tree is the red oak and the state sport is borrowing. It's a hard one to endorse, but there's no denying how badly upgrades are needed at our universities, and if Rutgers, et al, can keep some of the graduates from shiny new facilities from leaving the state after they graduate, it could have a tangible effect on business.

When it comes to furrowed brows and scowls, the minimum wage issue is the referendum you want. Chris Christie looks at a minimum wage increase the same way you do when you examine your shoes after stepping on a stinkbug, but when it comes to getting such a measure passed, legislative Democrats are more deeply divided than I was as an undergraduate at Villanova University, torn between studying a career that would leave me fulfilled, happy and wealthy, or journalism. Christie already has drafted a veto message for a bill, should it reach him, so the constitutional amendment seems like a sensible route.

At that point, expect some heavy lobbying as businesses work to kill it. The concept of voters telling businesses how much compensation they should offer is a novel one, but you'll notice the economies of places that have tried this — like Cuba and the Soviet Union — are more bust than they are robust. That measure shouldn't get any support, but New Jersey has a fantastic record of favoring poorly defended ballot measures (be sure to click that editorial, I'm very proud of it, especially the part at the end warning about trialkyl prebiotic pneumorrhagia) and rejecting economically intelligent ones, so it will be interesting theater going forward.

I'm even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

Share This Story On:

Your vote still doesn't count

By

Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

advertisement

New Jersey voters — the live ones, at least — are used to the sensation that their votes don't count in a presidential election, since we are committed to a blue state, like a maniac depressive patient who refuses to take medication. (The dead voters, by contrast, are just happy someone keeps their memory alive by registering them.)

But a pair of discussed ballot issues could make the next two Novembers elections to remember. I'm referring to, of course, the higher education referendum on the books for this year and the minimum wage question that seems likely to get on the 2013 ballot.

The higher education bond — which would borrow $750 million to fund badly needed improvements at state universities — seems likely to pass, since it involves borrowing, as opposed to sensible budget appropriations, paid for via cuts to other services or new revenue generation, such as putting the Revel casino on a truck and driving it to the Meadowlands. We voters love our borrowing: New Jersey's state bird is the goldfinch, the state insect is the honeybee, the state tree is the red oak and the state sport is borrowing. It's a hard one to endorse, but there's no denying how badly upgrades are needed at our universities, and if Rutgers, et al, can keep some of the graduates from shiny new facilities from leaving the state after they graduate, it could have a tangible effect on business.

When it comes to furrowed brows and scowls, the minimum wage issue is the referendum you want. Chris Christie looks at a minimum wage increase the same way you do when you examine your shoes after stepping on a stinkbug, but when it comes to getting such a measure passed, legislative Democrats are more deeply divided than I was as an undergraduate at Villanova University, torn between studying a career that would leave me fulfilled, happy and wealthy, or journalism. Christie already has drafted a veto message for a bill, should it reach him, so the constitutional amendment seems like a sensible route.

At that point, expect some heavy lobbying as businesses work to kill it. The concept of voters telling businesses how much compensation they should offer is a novel one, but you'll notice the economies of places that have tried this — like Cuba and the Soviet Union — are more bust than they are robust. That measure shouldn't get any support, but New Jersey has a fantastic record of favoring poorly defended ballot measures (be sure to click that editorial, I'm very proud of it, especially the part at the end warning about trialkyl prebiotic pneumorrhagia) and rejecting economically intelligent ones, so it will be interesting theater going forward.

I'm even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

Share This Story On:
advertisement

Comments


Be the first to comment.



Please note: All comments will be reviewed and may take up to 24 hours to appear on the site.

Post Comment
     View Comment Policy
advertisement
ERROR: Macro defaultSidebar is missing!
ERROR: Macro footer_top is missing!
Back to Top