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There's no news on Mondays, anyway

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Mill Creek opens residential community in Parsippany

By Elana Knopp
May 24, 2018 07:32 AM

Mill Creek Residential multifamily investor has opened Modera Parsippany residential community in Parsippany. CONTINUE READING

HFF helps arrange $10.2M for self-storage project

By Elana Knopp
May 24, 2018 07:54 AM

Holliday Fenoglio Fowler helped arrange $10.2 million in financing for the development of a CubeSmart self-storage facility on 6.5 acres in Nutley. CONTINUE READING

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Corporate America Realty & Advisors leases Little Falls industrial site

By Elana Knopp
May 23, 2018 12:48 PM

Rutherford-based Corporate America Realty & Advisors President Howard Applebaum recently represented H.C. International Inc. in an industrial lease agreement in Little Falls. CONTINUE READING

Princeton-based drug researcher opens Tokyo office

By Vince Calio
May 22, 2018 11:17 AM

WIRB-Copernicus Group, a Princeton-based medical research group, has opened a Tokyo office to expand its capabilities in conducting global clinical trials. CONTINUE READING

Advance Realty Executive Quarters at Bedminster wins TOBY award

By Elana Knopp
May 22, 2018 07:20 AM

Advance Realty Executive Quarters at Bedminster has been named The Outstanding Building of the Year by the New Jersey chapter of the Building Owners and Managers Association. CONTINUE READING

Marcus & Millichap completes sale of Union City mixed-use building

By Elana Knopp
May 22, 2018 01:01 PM

Marcus & Millichap recently wrapped up the sale of a mixed-use building in Union City for almost $1.8 million. CONTINUE READING

NAI Hanson negotiates sale of Elmwood Park industrial/flex facility

By Elana Knopp
May 22, 2018 11:47 AM

NAI James E. Hanson real estate firm has negotiated the sale of a 45,000-square-foot industrial/flex building in Elmwood Park. CONTINUE READING

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There are a lot of people grieving about the state of print media in the wake of the Times-Picayune's decision to no longer publish a print edition seven days a week. Call me a nihilist, if you insist (I've been called far worse things), but I say, "What took so long?"

Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.
Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.

To say print media is in trouble is nothing new, but unfortunately, we don't have a Lassie to somehow communicate our troubles, through a sophisticated system of barking, to Timmy's parents and other readers. The digital age has much more efficient ways to communicate information than the ink-sodden toilet paper we hacks so vociferously lament. Take classifieds, for instance. They were the ultimate cash cow — you got about 20 words, in six-point agate type ("agate" from the Greeks, meaning "tiny letters you can't read without a microscope"), to hock the bicycle you haven't used since the Carter administration, and the newspaper got $45. Now, Craiglist has done the same thing, only more searchable, for free. How do you compete with that?

You can't, and the Times-Picayune gets it. You can't get readers to pay for online content, unless you are one of a very select few papers. And it's harder competing for the interest of readers with gray pages when Apple keeps developing newer and shinier toys to entice people to get their news in other ways.

The alternative, until now, has been the Gannett model — cut until you see bone, at which point, you get yourself a saw and keep going — or just closing up outright. True, there's a problem for papers with "daily" in the flag suddenly going non-daily, but the ability to produce more in-depth content, and regulate day-to-day news to the Web, is probably the best idea going right now, and the only one that encourages print and online to complement each other, instead of undercutting one another.

Or else, in the words of a colleague, we can just prepare for the day when we have to tell our grandchildren what we did for a living "without sounding like our grandparents trying to explain their jobs in the typing pool or as switchboard operators."

I'm even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

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There's no news on Mondays, anyway

By

Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

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There are a lot of people grieving about the state of print media in the wake of the Times-Picayune's decision to no longer publish a print edition seven days a week. Call me a nihilist, if you insist (I've been called far worse things), but I say, "What took so long?"

Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.
Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.

To say print media is in trouble is nothing new, but unfortunately, we don't have a Lassie to somehow communicate our troubles, through a sophisticated system of barking, to Timmy's parents and other readers. The digital age has much more efficient ways to communicate information than the ink-sodden toilet paper we hacks so vociferously lament. Take classifieds, for instance. They were the ultimate cash cow — you got about 20 words, in six-point agate type ("agate" from the Greeks, meaning "tiny letters you can't read without a microscope"), to hock the bicycle you haven't used since the Carter administration, and the newspaper got $45. Now, Craiglist has done the same thing, only more searchable, for free. How do you compete with that?

You can't, and the Times-Picayune gets it. You can't get readers to pay for online content, unless you are one of a very select few papers. And it's harder competing for the interest of readers with gray pages when Apple keeps developing newer and shinier toys to entice people to get their news in other ways.

The alternative, until now, has been the Gannett model — cut until you see bone, at which point, you get yourself a saw and keep going — or just closing up outright. True, there's a problem for papers with "daily" in the flag suddenly going non-daily, but the ability to produce more in-depth content, and regulate day-to-day news to the Web, is probably the best idea going right now, and the only one that encourages print and online to complement each other, instead of undercutting one another.

Or else, in the words of a colleague, we can just prepare for the day when we have to tell our grandchildren what we did for a living "without sounding like our grandparents trying to explain their jobs in the typing pool or as switchboard operators."

I'm even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

Share This Story On:
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