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There's no news on Mondays, anyway

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Cooper’s Ferry Partnership names new president, CEO

By Mario Marroquin
December 14, 2017 01:33 PM

Cooper’s Ferry Partnership board of trustees recently announced it has appointed Kris Kolluri as CEO and president of the organization. CONTINUE READING

IXP selected to manage Princeton's 9-1-1 emergency dispatch center

By Emily Bader
December 14, 2017 01:36 PM

Princeton-based IXP Corporation, a public safety and emergency communications solutions provider, has been awarded a contract by the town of Princeton to operate and manage its 9-1-1 emergency communications dispatch center. CONTINUE READING

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Moving services firm to relocate to NJ from Staten Island

By Mario Marroquin
December 14, 2017 01:47 PM

Commercial moving service firm Total Relocation Services has purchased a 20,095-square-foot industrial building in Irvington, brokerage NAI Hanson recently announced. CONTINUE READING

JLL to lease office building in Woodcliff Lake

By Mario Marroquin
December 13, 2017 12:25 PM

Developer Hudson Equities recently announced it has selected JLL as the exclusive leasing agent for the 240,000-square-foot office building at 300 Tice Blvd. CONTINUE READING

Bridgewater-based Clinical Genomics appoints senior advisor

By NJBIZ STAFF
December 12, 2017 01:15 PM

Bridgewater-based Clinical Genomics, a provider of cancer diagnostic solutions including liquid biopsy tests, announced it has appointed Roy Davis as senior advisor and board member. CONTINUE READING

MonGroup Properties completes leasing at Jaclyn Heights

By Mario Marroquin
December 11, 2017 01:09 PM

Developer MonGroup Properties announced its final phase of Jaclyn Heights in West New York has been fully leased. The property, located at 5817 Jefferson Street, added 40 new rentals to the Jaclyn Heights complex and leased up within six months. CONTINUE READING

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There are a lot of people grieving about the state of print media in the wake of the Times-Picayune's decision to no longer publish a print edition seven days a week. Call me a nihilist, if you insist (I've been called far worse things), but I say, "What took so long?"

Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.
Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.

To say print media is in trouble is nothing new, but unfortunately, we don't have a Lassie to somehow communicate our troubles, through a sophisticated system of barking, to Timmy's parents and other readers. The digital age has much more efficient ways to communicate information than the ink-sodden toilet paper we hacks so vociferously lament. Take classifieds, for instance. They were the ultimate cash cow — you got about 20 words, in six-point agate type ("agate" from the Greeks, meaning "tiny letters you can't read without a microscope"), to hock the bicycle you haven't used since the Carter administration, and the newspaper got $45. Now, Craiglist has done the same thing, only more searchable, for free. How do you compete with that?

You can't, and the Times-Picayune gets it. You can't get readers to pay for online content, unless you are one of a very select few papers. And it's harder competing for the interest of readers with gray pages when Apple keeps developing newer and shinier toys to entice people to get their news in other ways.

The alternative, until now, has been the Gannett model — cut until you see bone, at which point, you get yourself a saw and keep going — or just closing up outright. True, there's a problem for papers with "daily" in the flag suddenly going non-daily, but the ability to produce more in-depth content, and regulate day-to-day news to the Web, is probably the best idea going right now, and the only one that encourages print and online to complement each other, instead of undercutting one another.

Or else, in the words of a colleague, we can just prepare for the day when we have to tell our grandchildren what we did for a living "without sounding like our grandparents trying to explain their jobs in the typing pool or as switchboard operators."

I'm even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

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There's no news on Mondays, anyway

By

Back to Top Comments Email Print

Latest News

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There are a lot of people grieving about the state of print media in the wake of the Times-Picayune's decision to no longer publish a print edition seven days a week. Call me a nihilist, if you insist (I've been called far worse things), but I say, "What took so long?"

Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.
Can you believe this used to be one the top moneymaker in a newspaper? It was only a matter of time before someone found a better way to sell his crap.

To say print media is in trouble is nothing new, but unfortunately, we don't have a Lassie to somehow communicate our troubles, through a sophisticated system of barking, to Timmy's parents and other readers. The digital age has much more efficient ways to communicate information than the ink-sodden toilet paper we hacks so vociferously lament. Take classifieds, for instance. They were the ultimate cash cow — you got about 20 words, in six-point agate type ("agate" from the Greeks, meaning "tiny letters you can't read without a microscope"), to hock the bicycle you haven't used since the Carter administration, and the newspaper got $45. Now, Craiglist has done the same thing, only more searchable, for free. How do you compete with that?

You can't, and the Times-Picayune gets it. You can't get readers to pay for online content, unless you are one of a very select few papers. And it's harder competing for the interest of readers with gray pages when Apple keeps developing newer and shinier toys to entice people to get their news in other ways.

The alternative, until now, has been the Gannett model — cut until you see bone, at which point, you get yourself a saw and keep going — or just closing up outright. True, there's a problem for papers with "daily" in the flag suddenly going non-daily, but the ability to produce more in-depth content, and regulate day-to-day news to the Web, is probably the best idea going right now, and the only one that encourages print and online to complement each other, instead of undercutting one another.

Or else, in the words of a colleague, we can just prepare for the day when we have to tell our grandchildren what we did for a living "without sounding like our grandparents trying to explain their jobs in the typing pool or as switchboard operators."

I'm even more irreverent on Twitter @joe_arney.

Share This Story On:
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